ESA mission name for astronaut Tim Peake: Principia

Tim Peake

18 July 2014When ESA astronaut Tim Peake sets off for his six-month space journey next year, he will be flying under the mission name of Principia.

More than 4000 people replied to the call for a mission name earlier this year and Principia was suggested 20 times. The name refers to Isaac Newton’s world-changing three-part text on physics, Naturalis Principia Mathematica, describing the principal laws of motion and gravity.

Famously pondering why apples fall from trees, Newton wrote down the laws of gravity and laid the basis for working with it, a requirement for spaceflight. Tim Peake will spend six months living in weightlessness, the first time a British–ESA astronaut will visit the International Space Station.

“I am delighted with this name that honours one of Britain’s most famous scientists,” Tim says. “I hope it will also encourage people to observe the world as if for the first time ­– just as Isaac Newton did.

“Our planet Earth is a precious and beautiful place and we all need to safeguard it.”

Tim will be launched from Russia’s Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in November 2015 – and will be able to enjoy Newton’s favourite fruit as supply ships arrive at the international space laboratory. One of his aims is to inspire children during his stay in space, in particular by promoting healthy eating.

The International Space Station is first and foremost a place of science, and the six astronauts there spend much of their time working on experiments that cannot be done anywhere on Earth.

It’s a busy time in space for ESA astronauts, with Alexander Gerst currently working in the Station, Samantha Cristoforetti leaving for it in November this year, and Andreas Mogensen being launched shortly before Tim’s mission for a 10-day stay on the Station.

International Space Station
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Grandson Logan meets U.K. Astronaut Tim Peake

We visited the Farnborough Air Show yesterday. A great day out as always. Chatted to the various staff members on the ESA stand and the UK Space Agency stand. Listened to a lecture by Tim Peake.

He has had a very busy week and all of the media want a bit of him as the mission reaches the next milestone (mission name chosen-check). Space food chosen-check.

The mission patch is to be designed by children through the Blue Peter TV programme later this year.

Our grandson (space mad, but he also has a passion for steam engines and aeroplanes, especially loud ones) met up with Tim Peake at the airshow.

Logan meets Astronaut Tim Peake at Farnborough.

Logan meets Astronaut Tim Peake at Farnborough.

 

Astronaut Ken Ham in Scotland

ISSET’s Mission Discovery programme is a great opportunity for ordinary students to do something extraordinary.

High school and university students carry out biomedical research with NASA astronauts, rocket scientists and trainers for a week at one of the best universities in the world. In teams, you will propose an idea for your own biomedical experiment; the best idea will be sent to the International Space Station and put into practice in space.

With help from brilliant NASA role models, astronauts, astronaut trainers, scientists and engineers; you will learn about space through a variety of exhilarating hands-on activities, based on themes such as:

  • NASA leadership and team building
  • How space exploration benefits life on Earth
  • Experiencing the environment of space
  • Looking at different kinds of experiment & what makes them great
  • How you succeed in your dreams and ambitions

To learn more or to share information about Mission Discovery at St. John’s College, Annapolis, download one of our PDF packages:

Renfrewshire, Scotland Mission Discovery 2014 Brochure

 

About NASA Astronaut Ken Ham

NASA EXPERIENCE:  Selected by NASA in June 1998, he reported for training in August 1998.  His astronaut candidate training included orientation briefings and tours, numerous scientific and technical briefings, intensive instruction in shuttle and International Space Station systems, physiological training and ground school to prepare for T-38 flight training as well as learning water and wilderness survival techniques.  Initially assigned as Ascent/Entry, Orbit and station Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM), Ham completed his first spaceflight as pilot on STS-124 and logged more than 13 days in space.  He completed his second mission as commander of the STS-132 crew and has logged a total of 25 days, 12 hours, 41 minutes and 9 seconds in space.  Subsequently, Ham was assigned to the Aircraft Operations Division as a T-38N instructor pilot and WB-57F research pilot.  Ham left the agency in June 2012.

SPACEFLIGHT EXPERIENCE:  STS-124 Discovery (May 31 to June 14, 2008) was the 123rd space shuttle flight and the 26th space shuttle flight to the International Space Station.  STS-124 was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and docked with the station on June 2, 2008, to deliver the Japanese Experiment Module-Pressurized Module (JEM-PM) and the Japanese Remote Manipulator System.  The STS-124 shuttle astronauts delivered the 37-foot (11-meter) Kibo lab, added its rooftop storage room and performed three spacewalks to maintain the station and prime the new Japanese module’s robotic arm for work during the nine days it was docked at the orbiting laboratory.  STS-124 also delivered a new station crew member, Expedition 17 Flight Engineer Greg Chamitoff.  He replaced Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Garrett Reisman, who returned to Earth with the STS-124 crew.  The STS-124 mission was completed in 218 orbits, traveling 5,735.643 miles in 13 days, 18 hours, 13 minutes and 7 seconds.

STS-132 Atlantis (May 14 to May 26, 2010) was the 132nd space shuttle flight and the 32nd shuttle flight to the International Space Station.  STS-132 launched from Kennedy Space Center and docked with the station on May 16, 2010, to deliver Rassvet, a Russian-built Mini Research Module (MRM1) to the station.  STS-132 shuttle astronauts performed three spacewalks to install a spare antenna and a stowage platform, replace batteries on the P6 truss that store solar energy and retrieve a power data grapple fixture for installation at a later date.  They used Atlantis’ robotic arm to remove Rassvet from the shuttle payload bay and hand it to the station robotic arm, Canadarm2, for installation on the Zarya module.  The STS-132 mission was completed in 186 orbits, traveling 4,879,978 miles in 11 days, 18 hours, 28 minutes and 2 seconds.

Astronaut Ken Ham Portrait

STS-124 Mission Patch

STS-132 Mission Patch

STS-124 Crew Portrait

STS-132 Crew Portrait

Trip to the National Space Centre Leicester

On a recent trip to the National Space Centre at Leicester our grandson Logan needed a little persuading to dress up at first.

logan deakin rocket scientist of the future

I told him the button clearly read ‘Do not Touch’ but his curiosity got the better of him and he activated the zero-g mode in the Columbus lab mock-up!

Logan taking zero-g in his stride

Logan taking zero-g in his stride

He earned his young astronaut wings today.

Tim Peake at No.10

21 May 2013ESA astronaut Timothy Peake and UK prime minister David Cameron at the office of the prime minister number 10 Downing Street after it was announced yesterday that Tim will fly to the International Space Station in 2015.

Tim was a helicopter test pilot before joining the ESA astronaut corps in 2009. He is the third ESA astronaut from the new class of 2009 to be assigned a mission to the International Space Station.

The news comes as a culmination of 18 years of flight experience for the British Army and as a civilian pilot. An intense training schedule awaits Tim as he flies around the world to learn Space Station procedures from the international partners that built and operate the orbital outpost: Canada, USA, Russia, Japan and Europe.

Prime Minister David Cameron wished Tim well and said: “I am sure he will do us proud and I hope that he will inspire the next generation to pursue exciting careers in science and engineering.”

Tim’s classmate ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano is heading for the International Space Station next week on a Soyuz spacecraft from Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Alexander Gerst and Samantha Cristoforetti will follow one year later in 2014. Andreas Mogensen and Thomas Pesquet will fly before 2017.

Astronaut Tim Peake

ESA astronaut Timothy Peake set for Space Station

Timothy Peake

20 May 2013ESA’s Director General, Jean-Jacques Dordain, announced today that the ISS Multilateral Crew Operations Panel has decided on Friday, 17 May to accept his proposal to fly astronaut Timothy Peake to the International Space Station in 2015.

“When we recruited the six new ESA astronauts in May 2009, I made a promise to secure flight opportunities for all of them. Thanks to the decisions of the Member States at the Ministerial Council last November, we will be able to fulfil our commitment to fly all six newly selected astronauts before the end of 2017. The first three astronauts already had their missions assigned. Today I am very happy to announce the assignment of Timothy Peake for a mission to the International Space Station. The two remaining astronauts, Andreas Mogensen and Thomas Pesquet, will be assigned before mid-2015 for flights at the latest in 2017.”

Timothy Peake will join the crew of Expedition 46/47 for six months in 2015. He will be the first British citizen to live and work on the Space Station and it will be the eighth long-duration mission for an ESA astronaut.

Timothy’s classmate ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano is preparing for launch to the orbital outpost on 28 May. Timothy’s mission will follow those of ESA astronauts Alexander Gerst and Samantha Cristoforetti, both scheduled for launch in 2014.

“The value of Europe’s astronauts and the training given at the European Astronaut Centre is reflected in the large number of mission assignments awarded to ESA astronauts,” notes Thomas Reiter, ESA’s Director of Human Spaceflight and Operations.

A former helicopter test pilot and Major in the British Army, Timothy is thrilled with his assignment: “I am delighted to be proposed for a long-duration mission to the International Space Station. This is another important mission for Europe and in particular a wonderful opportunity for European science, industry and education to benefit from microgravity research.

“Since joining the European Astronaut Corps in 2009, I have been training to work on the Station and I am extremely grateful to the ground support teams who make it possible for us to push the boundaries of knowledge through human spaceflight and exploration.”

About Timothy Peake

In 2009, Timothy was appointed as a UK ambassador for science and space-based careers. He has worked with the UK Space Agency in developing the country’s microgravity research programme.

After graduating from basic astronaut training in November 2010, Timothy continued training to increase his skills in weightlessness, including working in spacesuits, and his knowledge of the different modules of the Space Station.

In 2011, Timothy took part in ESA’s international Caves training that simulated space exploration during a week-long stay underground, isolated from the outside world.

In 2012, he spent almost two weeks in an underwater base off the coast of Florida, USA, as part of NASA’s Extreme Environment Mission Operations, or NEEMO – a testbed for space exploration technologies. The course focused on asteroid exploration involving communication delays with ground control and working on a simulated asteroid.

From his homebase at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, Timothy will start his mission training with the partners of the International Space Station. It will take him to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, USA, Star City, near Moscow, Russia, as well as Japan and Canada.

About the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) is Europe’s gateway to space.

ESA is an intergovernmental organisation, created in 1975, with the mission to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.

ESA has 20 Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, of whom 18 are Member States of the EU.

ESA has Cooperation Agreements with eight other Member States of the EU and is discussing an Agreement with the one remaining (Bulgaria). Canada takes part in some ESA programmes under a Cooperation Agreement.

ESA is also working with the EU on implementing the Galileo and Copernicus programmes.

By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, ESA can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

ESA develops the launchers, spacecraft and ground facilities needed to keep Europe at the forefront of global space activities.

Today, it launches satellites for Earth observation, navigation, telecommunications and astronomy, sends probes to the far reaches of the Solar System and cooperates in the human exploration of space.

Learn more at www.esa.int

For further information, please contact:

ESA Media Relations Office Tel: +33 1 53 69 72 99 Fax: +33 1 53 69 76 90 Email: media@esa.int

For interview opportunities, please contact:

Jules Grandsire European Astronaut Centre Astronaut Communication Officer Tel: +49 22 03 6001 205 Email: Jules.Grandsire@esa.int

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reg Turnill Sadly Passes Aged 97

Reg Turnill, the BBC’s aerospace correspondent from the beginning of the space age and through the Apollo era, has died aged 97.

After being sent to Moscow to cover the first manned space launch, he regularly reported from Cape Canaveral and Houston on the Apollo Moon missions.

In 1970, he broke the story to the world that Apollo 13 was in trouble.

Mr Turnill’s eldest son confirmed the news of his father’s death to BBC Radio Kent.

For the full story please visit the BBC Site

I had the great pleasure of meeting him a few years ago now, my condolences to family and friends.

Every space enthusiast has a copy of one of his books………..rest in peace Reg.